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Self-Management and Mindful Awareness in Law School and Beyond

Lecture Title: 
Self-Management and Mindful Awareness in Law School and Beyond
Year: 
2015

This presentation focused on when, where, why and how mindfulness can be taught and used in law schools and law practice environments – and where it might not fit. About 40 U.S. law schools now offer training in how, why and when to control the focus of your attention through a process called mindfulness (as do law firms, corporations, sports teams and other organizations). Mindfulness, which a person cultivates in silent meditation, can help law students and lawyers deal better with stress, increase satisfaction, and improve their performance in any student or lawyering activity.  

Riskin previously served as director of the Center for the Study of Dispute Resolution and Isidor Loeb professor of law at the University of Missouri. He also works at integration of mindfulness into the education of lawyers and other dispute-resolution professionals. He has published several books and numerous articles on dispute resolution (some dealing with “grids” of mediator orientations – facilitative-evaluative/broad-narrow), many articles on the potential contributions of mindfulness to law and conflict resolution, and essays in popular publications, including The Atlantic Monthly and The New York Times Magazine. He has led training workshops around the world. He has won numerous awards for his work, including the Award for Outstanding Scholarship from the ABA Section of Dispute Resolution in 2013. He studied at New York University School of Law (J.D.) and Yale Law School (LL.M.).

Lectures: 
Speaker: 
Leonard L. Riskin